80% Success rate of DPT students to employment – by trainer Raylee Gormley

DPT trainer, Raylee Gormley, gives an account of her year as a trainer and shows why DPT students have such a high success rate in employment.

Building relationships

Once again another year has just flown by. And once again, the highlights for 2018 have been exactly the same as previous years – the relationships we build as an organisation and trainers with our students and facilities. 

This year, this has been evidenced by the amount of return students we are welcoming – students who return to complete further studies, or to complete competencies and to attend workshops. 

Also this past year has also seen some ex-students gain RN and EN qualifications. But what I remember is that we started them on that journey! There is no doubt that the community services sector is a booming business. Luckily for us, this has resulted in most of our students obtaining employment immediately following placement or very soon afterwards.  

Making a difference

A lot of people within their employment ask themselves ‘Have I made a difference?’ – their honest reply would often have to be ‘No, really I haven’t’. When I ask MYSELF that question I can honestly reply that I and our organisation HAS made a difference to someone’s life. We have literally set people upon a new career and in some cases a new life. 

As a trainer my principle is: I want students to wake up in the morning and WANT to come to class. Trainers need to be able to engage students – with real situational anecdotes, information and humour. One of the sounds I don’t really respond well to as a trainer is the sound of silence. I WANT my students to be discussing ideas and to be questioning what I’m teaching. I WANT my classroom to be a learning environment, not just a testing one. 

Gaining employment success

I believe this is why our students gain employment – they are continuously learning from people who have been there, people who understand the challenges and people who remember what is was like to be a student and a new employee. We mustn’t forget that – we were once our students. Please treat them with the respect you would want to receive yourself. 

I stay in touch with my ex-students. Many come in to talk to the class about their employment and some have even brought their clients in to meet prospective workers. The clients themselves often offer valuable insight into what they are looking for in a worker. 

I would like to think we can continue to entice people to want to learn through us and allow us to assist them on their new path – that is, after all, our job. 

Raylee Gormley – Maroochydore