Cover your butt in aged care - 5 tips to success

15 Jun 2018 9:43 AMJen Fitzgerald
Cover your butt in aged care - 5 tips to success

This is not a blog about getting out of trouble while on the job in aged care, it is a blog about keeping out of trouble. 5 tips on how to be the best communicator ever.

 

This is not a blog about getting out of trouble while on the job in aged care, it is a blog about keeping out of trouble. 5 tips on how to be the best communicator ever.

Communication Always follow the 6 C’s of communication and you won’t go wrong.

C is for correct

Concrete – nothing vague only write the facts

Considerate - legible and with correct grammar and spelling

Clear – able to be understood

Complete – the whole story

Concise – the whole story but summarised. Only write the main points

This applies to all verbal and non - verbal communication. The 6 C’s will always cover your butt because they are the best practice model for communication.

Write down everything- I mean EVERYTHING

Carry a small pad with you and write notes. Date them and use the 6 C’s when writing. Even if nothing happens on the shift you will improve your writing skills. It may also save you one day and you will definitely cover your butt.

Read this Power of pad blog 

Buddy conflict

Your buddy may report you for something – it could be anything. It may be legit or it could just be a bad hair day for them. If it’s the latter, don't try to change the difficult person. Generally, difficult people have well-established behavior patterns. Talk with them a.s.a.p so the problem gets solved quickly before it escalates. Preferably early in the shift. Cover your butt by writing down the incident and conversation with your buddy so if it does go to report you have written evidence

If it isn’t charted it didn’t happen

This is oldie but a goldie. Use the 6C's again to improve your charting. Mostly it’s a simple task like a fluid chart or bowel chart. The trick is to write down all charting details throughout the shift so you won't have to try and remember after a long 8 hours shift. Again the power of the pad.

 

Keep your writing objective 

Chart only what you witnessed or can attest to. Avoid writing slang language. Instead, if a patient is being combative don’t write "resident was being nasty and abusive". Give a clearer picture of the resident's actions. Also, chart any refusals and education given. For instance, “Resident refused food before insulin. Resident was asked if their was any issue and it was pointed out that food must come before insulin.”

© DPT 2018